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1-October-2016

84 SAFETYZONE ABOUT TAD Identifying road safety as one of its three worldwide focus points, Toyota has introduced Toyota Advanced Driving (TAD) as a way of enhancing its customers’ safety on the road by simulating day-to-day situations and giving drivers the skills they need to deal with them. TAD originated from the Continental Off-Road Academy established in 1990 and is a leading innovator in its sphere. Ensuring that training facilities are manned by qualified instructors who operate to the highest standards, TAD is the first and, thus far, only off-road training organisation to have achieved AA Quality Assured status. Driving courses include defensive, on-road/off-road, advanced 4×4 and gravel/ dirt driving – all eight hours in duration – and hijack prevention (three hours). Call TAD on tel 011-467-4040, visit www.toyota.co.za, or email info@tad-sa.co.za. ABOVE: Good driver safety starts with a good driving position. As in this Toyota 86, sit so that you are able to reach all controls comfortably while retaining full command of the steering, gearing and pedals. LEFT: Different types of road signs have different regulatory effects and are colour coded to show their intended function. KEEP LEFT, PASS RIGHT When driving on a road with more than one lane going in the same direction, the rule of the road dictates that all traffic should keep to the left lane and that the right-hand lanes are for overtaking only. Use your indicators to signal any action you wish to perform on the road – it is the only way other road users can read and interpret your intended action from a distance. Often drivers, and especially inexperienced ones, get nervous when an emergency vehicle approaches from behind with lights flashing and sirens wailing. Activate your emergency flashers to acknowledge that you are aware of them, slow down gradually, move left and avoid making hasty directional changes. Avoid getting annoyed with slower or inconsiderate drivers by overtaking on a solid or barrier line. These lines are there precisely to advise you that it is unsafe to do so. You are simply putting your life and that of others at risk to save a few seconds in travel time. A huge contributing factor to accidents is the high number of older, often unroadworthy vehicles on our roads. Regard all of them as a potential hazard and adapt your driving behaviour accordingly. By being alert and trying to anticipate what other road users are going to do, you will always be prepared to react in an instant should your immediate traffic situation change. Traffic signs are there to advise you of road conditions – interpret them correctly and adhere to their intended message.


1-October-2016
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